USING WHEY IN YOUR GARDEN

SOURCE: http://blog.cheesemaking.com/using-whey-in-your-garden/

Trying to figure out what to do with left over whey when I make cheese, it’s usually about a gallon or so. If you don’t want to use it in protein shakes the garden is your best place! http://www.blog.cheesemaking.com gives us the full breakdown how to use:

SALT

We use unsalted whey because salt is not useful in the garden.  Fortunately, most of the time, when we make cheese, we salt the curds after we drain off the whey, so this is usually not an issue.

ACID WHEY VS SWEET WHEY

We need to bear in mind that there is a difference between acid whey and sweet whey:  Sweet whey comes from cheese we make with rennet.  Acid whey is a byproduct when we make dairy products that don’t involve the use of rennet – yogurt, buttermilk, kefir, etc.  (There is sub-category of acid whey called “cooked whey” which is the whey leftover from making panir, queso fresco and ricotta.  It has less protein and less vitamins and minerals than the other wheys but it can still be used in the garden.)

Acid whey is more acidic than sweet whey.  This is because some of the lactose in it has been converted to lactic acid.  Sweet whey has a pH greater than or equal to 5.6, whereas acid whey has a pH less than or equal to 5.1 (from Wikipedia).  Another difference is that acid whey has slightly more vitamins and minerals in it than sweet whey.

Many articles erroneously recommend using only sweet whey in gardening and not acid whey.  That is based on the idea that you might go out and throw a gallon of acid whey onto your tomato plant with no regard for the acid content.  That would not be good for your plants.  In fact, some people pour acid whey on their weeds to kill them!  (We’re assuming here that you understand the difference between the two kinds of whey and that you will follow the directions below when using it.)

Both kinds of whey can damage the environment when large quantities of it are dumped into bodies of water because changing the pH of the water effects the fish, etc.

CHANGING THE PH OF THE SOIL

For those of you who don’t generally consider this aspect of gardening, the pH of the soil is the level of acidity.  The lower the pH, the more acidic the soil is and the higher the pH, the more alkaline it is.

This is important because plants can’t get the nutrients they need from the soil unless the soil has the right amount of acidity.  Different plants prefer different levels, so, soil that is good for one type of plant, is not good for another.  There are many good charts online showing optimal pH ranges for plants; here’s one from the Farmer’s Almanac – click here.

How do you know the pH of your soil?  Most universities have soil testing labs and you can send samples to them for a small fee.  The information you receive is absolutely invaluable.  Or, if you already have the type of pH meter we sell (click here) to use when making cheese, you can use the same pH meter to test your garden’s soil.

If you don’t know the pH of your soil, you don’t really know whether whey will be good for it.  Odds are it will be for the acid-loving plants, but if your soil is already very acidic (5 – 5.5), whey would not be a good choice.

Generally speaking, it’s a fool’s errand to try to change the acidity of your soil; it’s preferable to simply plant the right plants in the right place.  However, that isn’t always possible (because we just have to have that gorgeous hydrangea in our alkaline soil).  So, most of us make amendments of one kind or another.

We use various products for this – whey, vinegar, sphagnum peat, sulfur or any acidifying fertilizer.  In any case, it is not wise to change the pH too rapidly.

FERTILIZING VALUE

As stated, you would usually use whey on your acid-loving plants to change the pH.  However, whey has some value as a fertilizer in itself.

It actually has small quantities of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (as well as calcium and magnesium).  The N-P-K ratio is typically 0.15-0.05-0.17.  (Acid whey has less protein than sweet whey, but it still contains many of the same vitamins and minerals in sweet whey.)

This is low enough for you to use it regularly without fear of over-fertilizing.

Directions for use:

Strain your whey in cheesecloth or butter muslin so there are not big pieces of curd floating in it.

Dilute it before adding it to your soil.  This is an inexact science, but we suggest you dilute it in the same amount of water to start, so you have a 50:50 split.

Pour it around the base of your plants and not on the plants themselves.

Try not to give your plants a total of more than 1″ of diluted whey per week.  (You will need a rain gauge for this.)  A common recommendation is to use 1 gallon of diluted whey per 10 square feet of garden space every seven to 14 days.*

CONTROLLING POWDERY MILDEW

Some folks spray whey onto their plants to prevent the spread of fungal diseases like powdery mildew.

Directions:  Strain your whey, dilute it (50 parts water:50 parts sweet whey or 70 parts water:30 parts acid whey) and spray it on your plants bi-weekly.  You can also use it as a deterrent in advance if you feel that your plants are highly susceptible to powdery mildew.

ADDING TO YOUR COMPOST

Whey is a great supplement to your compost because the carbon:nitrogen ratio averages 20:1.  (UMN.edu)

Strain it and, after you add it to your compost, turn the pile so the whey doesn’t heat it up too much.

If you are worm composting, add only a few diluted tablespoons per week – the worms don’t like too much acidity.

*This is from Hunker:  An all-purpose fertilizer with an N-P-K ratio of 24-8-16 is diluted at a rate of 1 tablespoon per 1 gallon of water. This supplies 0.1 ounces of nitrogen, 0.03 ounces of phosphorus and 0.06 ounces of potassium per application. To apply the same amount of nitrogen using whey, mix the whey half-and-half with water. This will supply 0.1 ounces of nitrogen, 0.04 ounces of phosphorus and 0.12 ounces of potassium per gallon. Use the mixture in place of regular fertilizer every other time you fertilize. Use 1 gallon of diluted fertilizer or whey per 10 square feet of garden space every seven to 14 days.

Homemade Soft Pretzels

SOURCE: https://www.loveandlemons.com/soft-pretzels-recipe/

A treat for everyone in the family who doesn’t love pretzels! This was one recipe I was a little scared to tried but going to do it! Thank you loveandlemons.com my kids are so excited:

Ingredients

For the pretzel dough
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup
  • 1 pkg. (¼ ounce) active dry yeast (2¼ teaspoons)
  • 1½ cups warm water
  • 4½ cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons sea salt
  • ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil or canola oil, more for brushing
  • Coarse sea salt, for sprinkling
For the poaching water
  • 6 cups water
  • 2 tablespoons baking soda

Instructions

  • Prepare the pretzel dough: In a small bowl, combine the maple syrup, yeast, and water and proof for 5 minutes or until foamy.
  • In the bowl of a mixer fitted with a dough hook attachment, place the flour, salt, olive oil, and the yeast mixture. Mix on medium-low speed for 5 to 6 minutes, until the dough is well-formed around the hook. If the dough is very dry after 3 minutes, add 1 tablespoon of water.
  • Transfer the dough to a clean lightly floured work surface and gently knead to form into a ball. If the dough is too sticky, add a little more flour. Brush a large bowl with ½ teaspoon of olive oil and place the dough inside. Cover with plastic wrap and set aside in a warm spot for 60 to 90 minutes, until the dough is almost doubled in size.
  • Preheat the oven to 450°F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  • Turn the dough out onto a clean (not floured) work surface and divide it into 8 equal pieces. Roll one piece of dough into an 18-inch rope. Grab the ends of the dough rope to make a U shape. Cross one of the ends of the rope over the other, leaving a wide loop of dough below them. Then, wrap the dough ends around each other again to create the pretzel’s twist. Fold the twist towards you, into the center of the dough loop, to make a pretzel shape. (See step-by-step photos above). Place it onto the baking sheet and repeat with the remaining dough.
  • Prepare the poaching water: In a large pot, combine the 6 cups of water and the baking soda and bring to a boil. Drop pretzels, one at a time, into the pot. Boil for 30 seconds, then lift out using a slotted spoon and place onto the baking sheet. While the dough is still wet, sprinkle with coarse salt. Use a sharp knife to cut a 4-inch slit along the bottom of each pretzel.
  • Bake for 14 minutes or until golden brown.

HEAVY CREAM ALTERNATIVES

SOURCE: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323822#butter-and-milk

Heavy cream is a common ingredient in a lot of recipes from desserts to casseroles. So if you need a quick sub because the store is out or you are vegan here are other ingredients you can use for your recipe:

1. Butter and milk

Heavy cream contains more fat than milk does, so a combination of butter and milk can act as an excellent replacement in many recipes.

When there is no heavy cream to hand, people can use the following mixture in its place:

  • three-quarters of a cup of milk
  • one-quarter of a cup of melted unsalted butter

This substitute will not whip in the same way that heavy cream does. It can, however, replace heavy cream in baked goods and creamy sauces.

2. Oil and dairy-free milk

To make the equivalent of 1 cup of a dairy-free heavy cream substitute, try the following recipe:

  • measure out two-thirds of a cup of rice or soy milk
  • mix well with one-third of a cup of extra light olive oil or melted dairy-free margarine

This substitute will not whip like heavy cream. People can try using these substitutions in a variety of dishes to determine which combinations work best for them.https://tpc.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html

3. Full-fat coconut cream

Full-fat coconut cream has a creamy texture. It whips in a similar way to heavy cream, and the two are close in consistency.

To make coconut whipped cream, follow these steps:

  • chill a can of full-fat coconut milk in the fridge overnight or until firm
  • open the can and pour away the liquid, leaving just the solid coconut cream
  • scoop the cream into a chilled bowl and whip with a handheld mixer or blender

Coconut whipped cream can substitute dairy whipped cream as an accompaniment to desserts. This non-dairy substitute has a distinct coconut flavor, which means that it will not be suitable for use in all dishes.

Coconut cream is an alternative to full-fat coconut milk that people can use in both sweet and savory dishes.

4. Evaporated milk

Evaporated milk is thicker and creamier than regular milk. People wanting a more healthful substitute for heavy cream can try using evaporated milk instead to reduce the number of calories and the amount of saturated fat in a recipe.

Evaporated milk contains 338 calories per cup, compared to 809 calories per cup of heavy cream.

However, evaporated milk does not whip like heavy cream.

5. Brown rice and low-fat milk

For savory dishes, such as soups, people can use a mixture of brown rice and low-fat milk to create an alternative to heavy cream. Unlike other healthful substitutes, such as low-fat milk and yogurt, this cream substitute will not curdle when people add it to hot food.

Use the following steps to make 3 cups of a healthful, savory substitute for heavy cream in soups:

  • mix 2 cups of unsalted chicken stock and a half-cup of uncooked instant brown rice
  • bring to the boil over medium-high heat and simmer for 25 minutes
  • let it stand for 5 minutes then blend in 1 cup of 1-percent low-fat milk until smooth

Using the brown rice mixture in place of heavy cream will significantly reduce the number of calories and the amount of fat in the dish.

6. Cashew cream

Cashew cream is a versatile substitute that people can use when making sweet or savory recipes.

To make cashew cream, use the following recipe:

  • soak 1 cup of raw cashews in water for 2 hours
  • drain the cashews
  • mix the cashews with three-quarters of a cup of filtered water and a pinch of salt
  • blend until smooth
  • store in the fridge in an airtight container to allow the cream to thicken

To whip cashew cream, chill it first and then lightly whisk it using a handheld mixer or blender. This cream can act as a vegan alternative to whipped cream on desserts.

People can also use cashew cream instead of heavy cream to thicken creamy soups or tomato sauces.ELECTION 2020Voting feels good.

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7. Pureed tofu

Pureed silken tofu can replace heavy cream in many recipes, although it will not whip. Add 1 cup of pureed tofu in place of 1 cup of heavy cream.

Silken tofu adds an extra protein boost to a meal. A 100 gram (g) portion provides 4.8 g of protein and only 55 calories.

8. White beans

Pureed pulses can replace heavy cream in soups and stews. They will thicken the dish and add nutrients, protein, and fiber.

Add 1 cup of pureed pulses in place of each cup of heavy cream.

Blended white beans are a high-protein addition to savory recipes, providing 19.02 g of protein per cup and 299 calories.

Pumpkin Flan In a Pastry Shell

SOURCE: https://www.marthastewart.com/318847/pumpkin-flan-in-a-pastry-shell?utm_source=emailshare&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=email-share-recipe&utm_content=20201003

Halloween is one of the most exciting holiday for me and my kids, I love to check out Martha’s website she always has great recipes and fun decor! So here is another pumpkin recipe for all pumpkin lovers that can’t get enough during the season:

Ingredients

  • 2 3/4 cups sugar
  • 2 1/4 cups milk
  • 1 1/2 cups canned pumpkin puree
  • 2 teaspoons freshly grated ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 5 large whole eggs
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
  • All-purpose flour, for dusting
  • Pate Brisee for Plum Crumb Pie
  • 1 cup whipped cream, or creme fraiche (optional)

Directions

Instructions Checklist

  • Have ready eight 4-inch metal pie pans, and prepare an ice-water bath.
  • In a small saucepan, combine 2 cups sugar and 1 cup water; set over medium-high heat. Cook, stirring, until sugar has dissolved. Cover, and bring to boil; cook until condensation washes down sides. Remove cover; boil until syrup turns deep amber in color. Quickly submerge pan in ice-water bath.
  • Working quickly, divide caramel among the pie pans; swirl each to coat bottom. Set aside to cool.
  • Heat oven to 325 degrees. Pour milk into a saucepan, and set over high heat. Bring just to a boil; set aside.
  • In a large bowl, combine pumpkin puree, remaining 3/4 cup sugar, ginger, nutmeg, cinnamon, salt, whole eggs, and egg yolks. Mix in vanilla and warm milk; pass through fine sieve, discarding solids. Divide mixture among pie pans, filling two-thirds full. Transfer pie pans to a roasting pan.
  • Loosely drape piece of foil over top of roasting pan, transfer to oven, and add enough boiling water to the roasting pan to come halfway up sides of pie pans (always fill roasting pan with boiling water after transferring to oven, to avoid burning). Bake until centers are nearly set — a thin-bladed knife inserted into centers should come out clean — 60 to 65 minutes. Transfer roasting pan to wire rack to cool. Remove flans from water, and dry bottoms of pie pans. Cover with plastic wrap, and refrigerate flans overnight.
  • Heat oven to 375 degrees. Have ready four 5-inch flan rings or fluted tartlet tins; line two baking sheets with parchment. On a lightly floured surface, roll out pate brisee to an 1/8-inch thickness. Cut out eight 7-inch circles. Ease a circle into each flan ring, letting excess drape over top. Fit dough into bottom corners of rings, using knuckles to work dough from top down, not from the center out. Using a rolling pin, roll over tops of rings, creating neat tops and removing any excess dough. Prick bottom of each shell several times with a fork. Transfer shells to baking sheets, and chill 30 minutes.
  • Line shells with foil, and fill with pie weights or dried beans. Bake 20 minutes, and remove foil and weights. Bake until shells are golden brown, 2 to 4 minutes more. Transfer baking sheets to a wire rack, and let shells cool, 1 hour. Remove shells from rings.
  • When ready to serve, place shells on 4 dessert plates. Unmold flan by running a knife carefully around edge of pan, and invert it over a shell; caramel sauce will flow, filling shell. Repeat with remaining shells and flan. Top with whipped cream or creme fraiche, if desired.

Cook’s Notes

If you do not use the exact sizes of the pans called for in this recipe, just be sure that they are close to these sizes and that the pastry shell you make is slightly larger than the custard.

21 Creative and Delicious Ways to Enjoy Your Pumpkin After Halloween

SOURCE: https://www.thepennyhoarder.com/save-money/21-fun-ways-enjoy-pumpkin-halloween/?aff_id=86&aff_sub3=20201006&aff_unique2=ITR-a4a3f557-1324-4c2f-854c-124ed1337249&utm_medium=email&utm_source=daily&utm_campaign=daily20201007&utm_content=savemoney&sms

Every year millions buy pumpkins some carve them, some display them whole, and others just put them all around the house to look at them. So what do you do after Halloween with a 10lb pumpkin? No need to guess because http://www.pennyhoarder.com did the research for you:

1. Make Pumpkin Puree

While it doesn’t sound appetizing on its own, pumpkin puree is one of my favorite things to make with leftover pumpkins.

It’s incredibly versatile: You’ll be able to turn your puree into pumpkin muffins, breads and soups down the road — even a delicious Thanksgiving pumpkin pie. Pumpkin puree is the base for most of the delicious dishes on this list.

Creating the puree is simple: Just boil, bake or steam your pumpkin, according to Good Housekeeping. If you used a real candle in your jack o’ lantern, make sure to cut off and discard any burned sections or leftover wax.

The puree freezes well for future use; I like to use zip-closure freezer bags, filled and partially flattened for easy stacking.

2. Make Your Own Pumpkin Spice Latte

Tempted by the versions on offer at seemingly every coffee shop? Instead of dropping $5 on a pumpkin spice latte that doesn’t actually contain any pumpkin, make your own.

Inspired by a fall weekend in a town without a coffee shop, Betsy Officer created her own PSL. “Not only is this recipe delicious and super easy, but it also is 100% natural and can be made with organic ingredients,” she explained. “Plus, I can now drink pumpkin spice lattes as early/or late into the season as I like!”

She shared two variations of the recipe: a latte made with espresso, and a café au lait made with standard drip-brewed coffee.

Ingredients:

  • 3/4 cup milk, ideally 2%, for the latte (if you’re making cafe au lait, 1/2 cup milk will give you a 2:1 coffee/milk ratio)
  • 1 espresso shot for the latte (or 1 cup drip coffee)
  • 1/4 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice mixture (or mix your own cinnamon, ginger and nutmeg blend)
  • 1 teaspoon maple syrup
  • 1 teaspoon pumpkin puree
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • Optional: cinnamon sticks and/or maple pumpkin butter as garnish

Measure and pour milk into a saucepan on your stove. Add in pumpkin pie spice, maple syrup, pumpkin puree and vanilla extract. Stir well. Heat the mixture on medium/hot heat, stirring occasionally.

Meanwhile, brew coffee or espresso. For cafe au lait, Officer recommends using a pumpkin spice blend such as Dunkin Donuts or Trader Joe’s Pumpkin Spice coffee.

Remove milk from the stovetop once it’s hot (Officer waits until it’s just about to boil) and use a milk frother to froth it. The mixture should double in size and create a nice foam. If you don’t have a frother, you can find one online for less than $20 (she uses this one) or use your blender.

Once milk is frothed, combine in a mug with espresso or coffee. Garnish with pumpkin pie spice. If you’d like, add a cinnamon stick or drizzle with a bit of maple pumpkin butter.

3. Enjoy a Pumpkin Cocktail or Pumpkin Beer

For those looking for something a little stronger than a latte, these seasonal drinks are just the ticket. You’ll need a few additional ingredients — and brewing equipment if you’re making beer — but these pumpkin drinks will spice up any post-Halloween party.

Enjoy planning ahead? Bottle your pumpkin beer or preserve your pumpkin now, then break out the drinks with your Thanksgiving dinner.

4. Have Pumpkin Lasagna

Need a dinner idea for Nov. 1? Try this yummy vegetarian pumpkin lasagna.

Taste of Home calls it a “comforting fall dish” — who doesn’t love those?

5. Make Pumpkin Butter

This seasonal treat is delicious on toast, in smoothies or on oatmeal. You can make it all year if you freeze extra pumpkin puree.

Check out this simple recipe on Oh She Glows (bonus if this is important to you: It’s vegan).

6. Snack on Roasted Seeds

They’re a classic snack for a reason. A handful of roasted pumpkin seeds is a delicious way to get iron, magnesium, zinc and a healthy dose of fiber.

Roasting them is simple — just dry out the seeds and bake them on a baking sheet with olive oil and salt — but play with toppings to find one that works for you: salt and pepper, chili powder or cinnamon are all good options.

7. Make Vegetable Stock with the Guts

While the flesh and seeds are often popular foods, the stringy insides of pumpkins usually go straight to the trash (or compost). No more!

Try adding them to other veggie bits (carrot tops, onion ends) to make a flavorful stock.

8. Bake Pumpkin Gut Bread

If you’re looking for something a little heartier than soup, try this recipe from Diana Johnson of Eating Richly. She calculates that making two loaves costs about $2.

9. Cook Pumpkin Risotto

Another way to put those guts to use: Try this delicious pumpkin risotto, which Gothamist Editor Nell Casey adapted from The New York Times.

10. Make Pumpkin Pickles

If you’re pickle-obsessed like me, you’ll want to try these babies. For a sweeter pickle to go with desserts or cheese platters, try this pickled sugar pumpkin recipe from Serious Eats.

Looking for something with a little more kick? Try these South Indian pumpkin pickles from Promenade Plantings.

11. Dry Pumpkin Skin into Chips

Don’t worry, I didn’t forget the skin of the pumpkin.

Use a dehydrator or your oven to dry the skin into crispy chips for snacks or garnishes, recommends Gina Harney of Fitnessista.

12. Use Pumpkins as Serving Bowls

File this idea under “brilliant:” Save on decorations (and dishwashing) by using pumpkins as serving bowls for soup or cider.

Here’s an easy way to make a pumpkin bowl, from Sanam Lamborn of My Persian Kitchen.

13. Turn a Pumpkin into a Planter

Keep the fall festivities going by using your pumpkin as a planter for a small potted plant.

The planter will last for several weeks, and then you can plant it directly in your garden to decompose.

14. Create a Pumpkin Bird Feeder

Feeling artsy? Feed your neighborhood birds by making this simple bird feeder from Instructables.

15. Save Them for Your Thanksgiving Table

No need to spend extra money on table decorations — plan to keep a pumpkin or two, and you’ll be all set. Use Pinterest for ideas and inspiration.

Your pumpkins will make it to Thanksgiving, as long as you choose wisely. An uncarved, healthy pumpkin “can last 8 to 12 weeks,” Cornell University horticulturalist Steve Reiners told NPR.

16. Make Pumpkin Snowmen

Why not try this cute, crafty way to reuse some of your Halloween decorations?

You’ll get an early start on your winter decorating — or if you’re feeling entrepreneurial, you could even try selling your creations.

17. Relax With a Pumpkin Face Mask

Out late at a Halloween party? Recharge your skin with pumpkin’s good-for-you vitamins A, C and E.

You’ll only need to add honey and milk, according to this simple recipe from Beautylish. Add this to the list of fun ways to save money with DIY beauty products!

18. Build a Pumpkin Catapult

If you’d rather throw your pumpkin than eat it or decorate with it, try building a pumpkin catapult or trebuchet.

19. Try Pumpkin Painting

This is a great chance for kids to have fun creating art with pumpkins, especially if they’re a little young for carving tools.

The best part? All you need is some butcher or craft paper, a few paper plates and washable paint. Or get a little more creative — The Artful Parent explains the details.

20. Save the Seeds

Not a fan of eating the seeds? Instead, hold onto them to plant in your garden next spring.

Growing your own pumpkins will save you money — and let you enjoy even more homemade treats next year.

21. Compost Your Pumpkin

At the very least, your leftover pumpkin can help you grow an incredible garden next year. Cut it into smaller pieces and toss it in the compost pile, then mix it into your soil next spring.

Disney Ghostly Halloween Recipes

SOURCE: https://d23.com/oogie-boogie-gummy-worm-cupcakes/

Every year I look forward to going to Disneyland for Halloween I love the decor they really go all out. And all the baked goodies and ghostly popcorn tins make me feel like a kid again. Since I won’t be spending Halloween Time at Disneyland this year, I will be making some of the magic at home instead. Thanks to Disneyland for posting a lot of their favorite Halloween Treats:

Oogie Boogie Gummy Worm Cupcakes

Ingredients:
Chocolate cupcakes
White canned frosting
Gummy worm candy
Gel food coloring

  1. Make 24 chocolate cupcakes.
  2. Mix yellow food coloring into the frosting. Stir in small amounts of green food coloring until reaching a bright green.
  3. To make Oogie Boogie’s pointy head, trim a cupcake into a cone shape. Spread a small amount of frosting onto the base of the cone-shaped cupcake and adhere to the top of another cupcake.
  4. Carefully cover the cone shape with green frosting. Make a hole into the cupcake where the worm will come out of his mouth. Poke the gummy worm into the hole, and then begin to draw his mouth with the black decorating gel around the worm. Add spooky eyes to finish.

TIP: Crumble the cupcake pieces to look like dirt to decorate the plate!

SOURCE: https://d23.com/pumpkin-pecan-pie/

Ingredients
1 homemade or store bought Pie Crust
2 tablespoons butter (softened)
½ cup granulated sugar
3 eggs (lightly beaten)
1 tablespoon white vinegar
½ teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 cup dark corn syrup
1½ cups pecans (chopped)
¼ cup pumpkin puree
whipped cream (for garnish)
cinnamon sugar (for garnish)

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Roll out pie dough to ⅛ inch thickness and line a 9-inch pie plate, allowing excess to drape over edge. Fold over edges and crimp, then trim any remaining excess. Line the pan with parchment and pour in baking beans or weights. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes or until crust is light golden.
  2. Meanwhile, cream butter and sugar, then add beaten eggs, vinegar, salt, vanilla, and corn syrup. Stir in pecans and pumpkin puree.
  3. Pour filling into prepared pie crust. Place pie on baking sheet. Bake on center rack of oven for 40 to 50 minutes or until set. Cool completely on wire rack. Serve with a garnish of whipped cream and cinnamon sugar. *Note: If crust is browning before center is cooked, tent edges of pie with foil and continue baking.
SOURCE: https://d23.com/recipe-pumpkin-beignets/

Ingredients

Pumpkin Beignets
1/2 tsp. dry yeast
1/4 cup warm water
4 cups all-purpose flour
1 cup canned pumpkin puree
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup heavy cream
1/4 cup hot water
1 egg
2 tbsp. vegetable shortening
1/2 tsp. salt
vegetable oil, for frying

Maple Glaze
3 tbsp. butter
1/4 cup maple syrup
1 cup powdered sugar

Preparation

Pumpkin Beignets
Sprinkle yeast over warm water in a small bowl, stirring to dissolve. Let stand for 5 minutes. Combine flour, pumpkin puree, sugar, heavy cream, hot water, egg, shortening, and salt in a large bowl; stir in yeast mixture. Mix dough just until combined and smooth. Let dough rest in bowl, covered with a clean kitchen towel, 30 minutes. Transfer dough to a well-floured surface. Pat to about 1/4-inch thickness and cut into 2-inch squares. Cover with a clean kitchen towel and let dough rise in a warm, draft-free area, about 1 to 1 1/2 hours. Heat three inches of vegetable oil to 350°F in a deep, heavy pot over medium-high heat. Fry beignets until golden brown, about 2 to 3 minutes, turning as soon as they brown on one side. Remove with tongs or a slotted spoon and place on paper towels to drain.

Maple Glaze
Combine butter and maple syrup in a medium microwave-safe bowl. Microwave until butter melts. Whisk in powdered sugar until smooth. Drizzle warm beignets with maple glaze and serve immediately.

And of course who can forget their candy apples and rice crispy treats!

Ingredients

  • Your favorite kind of apple–any kind will do (the rounder the better)
  • 1 bag caramel bits
  • 2 cups white chocolate chips
  • 1 cup milk chocolate chips plus a handful more for eyes
  • colorful gels to decorate

Special Materials

  • Lollipop stick (we recommend using one at least eight inches long)
  • Plastic squeeze bottle (optional)

Directions

  1. Rinse and thoroughly dry apple, then insert an eight-inch lollipop stick into the stem end of it.
  2. Prepare caramel bits according to package until melted.
  3. Dip apple into melted caramel until evenly coated. Spoon caramel over apple if necessary, making sure to allow excess caramel to drip off.
  4. Scrape caramel off bottom of apple, then set apple on a wax-paper-covered plate and refrigerate for at least one hour. Once caramel has set, take apple out of refrigerator.
  5. Melt white chocolate chips in a double boiler. Once chocolate is melted, dip caramel-covered-apple into white chocolate until evenly coated. Spoon white chocolate over apple if necessary, making sure to allow excess chocolate to drip off.
  6. Scrape white chocolate off bottom of apple, then set apple on a wax-paper-covered plate and refrigerate for at least one hour. Once white chocolate has set, take apple out of refrigerator.
  7. Use remaining melted milk chocolate as “glue” to stick on two large chocolate chips on the apple for eyes, draw the rest of features—eyebrows, smile, and dots. We suggest placing melted chocolate in a plastic squeeze bottle or a re-sealable sandwich bag for drawing features.
  8. Same steps can be used for rice crispy treats just cut into circle to join two smaller circles as the ears to the bigger circle for the head. You can use a toothpick to hold in place while chocolate sets.

Halloween DIY Decor

SOURCE: https://www.hgtv.com/design/make-and-celebrate/handmade/spooky-front-porch-decorating-ideas-for-halloween-pictures

Well with the weather still being so hot it doesn’t feel like October, we won’t be trick or treating this year another bummer. Does that mean we should just skip decorating of course not! Maybe you don’t go all out but just what makes you still feel the Halloween vibe:

SOURCE: https://www.hgtv.com/design/make-and-celebrate/handmade/spooky-front-porch-decorating-ideas-for-halloween-pictures

Spooky Door Decor could be as easy as a wreath just depends how creative you want to be. A wicker handbag full of creepy flowers and a few eyeballs looks like a step in the right direction! All the items can be found at Michael’s, joann’s, dollartree, biglots, or target.

Maybe something more simple but still gives Halloween feeling, what about taking a plastic skeleton and instead of just hanging on your door make a wreath. You can take skeleton apart and make a wire ring to hot glue all the bones all around it.

SOURCE: https://www.hgtv.com/design/make-and-celebrate/handmade/spooky-front-porch-decorating-ideas-for-halloween-pictures

Maybe you don’t want to carve a pumpkin but you still want to buy one for easy decor? Well maybe using as a vase and adding some natural flowers that will wilt overtime and go from fall to creepy fast!

SOURCE: https://asubtlerevelry.com/why-dont-we-carve-a-pineapple/

Now if you fear with our warm weather these options won’t last until Halloween go another route. Use succulent in a ceramic pumpkin instead many markets like Trader Joes or Sprouts may actually have them for sale already done. If not ceramic pumpkin vase you can find at any craft supply store.

SOURCE: https://www.hgtv.com/design/make-and-celebrate/handmade/spooky-front-porch-decorating-ideas-for-halloween-pictures

Mason jars are not just good for storing things you can also use them for decor. Wrap different size jars in gauze or cheesecloth seal with a glue gun, add some plastic spiders or skeleton hands. Make sure nothing is near the opening of jar and use a candle to get a nice glow.

PUMPKIN PIZZA

SOURCE: https://www.thecandidappetite.com/pumpkin-pizza/

It’s October and it’s pizza Friday win win!!! So what a surprise to mixing these two pizza and pumpkin. See pumpkin puree is good in all kinds of recipes:

INGREDIENTS

Sauce
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • ½ cup chopped yellow onion
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 cup yellow cherry tomatoes, sliced
  • ¾ cup pumpkin purée
  • 1 cup water (or vegetable stock)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper
  • ¼ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes (optional)
Pizza
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • ½ cup sliced Spanish chorizo, or Polish kielbasa
  • 1 cup sliced crimini mushrooms
  • 1 (16-ounce) pizza dough, store-bought or homemade
  • 2 tablespoons cornmeal
  • 1 cup shredded mozzarella
  • ½ cup shredded fontina cheese
  • ¼ cup grated parmesan cheese
  • ¼ cup fresh sage leaves
  • ¾ cup loosely packed fresh arugula
  • 2 tablespoons pumpkin seeds

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. For the sauce, place a medium saucepan over median-high heat with 1 tablespoons olive oil. Once hot, add the onions and garlic and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Stir in the cherry tomatoes, cooking until the tomatoes have blistered, another 5 minutes. Add the pumpkin purée and water, and stir until fully combined. Season with salt, pepper, red pepper flakes, and bring to a simmer. Lower the flame and cook until slightly reduced, about 10 minutes. Remove from heat and let cool slightly.
  2. To prepare the pizza toppings, set a skillet over medium-high heat with 1 tablespoon olive oil. Once hot, add the chorizo and cook until brown and crispy, about 5 minutes. Stir in the sliced mushrooms, cooking until also browned, another 5 minutes. Remove from heat.
  3. Preheat oven to 475 degrees F. Sprinkle a pizza stone, pizza pan, or baking sheet with cornmeal, set aside.
  4. Roll the dough out on a lightly floured work surface into about a ½-inch thick round circle. Transfer the dough to the prepared pizza stone (or baking pan or baking sheet), and fold the very edge over the top of the pizza to create a thick crust. Spread the center evenly with the pumpkin pizza sauce. Sprinkle with mozzarella, fontina and parmesan cheese. Top with the sautéed chorizo, mushrooms and sage leaves. Bake until puffed up, the cheese has melted, and the pizza is golden brown, about 15 to 20 minutes.
  5. Remove from the oven and let cool slightly. Top with arugula and pumpkin seeds right before cutting and serving. Enjoy!

Pumpkin Pie Truffles

SOURCE: https://www.biglots.com/images/marketing/social/092316-EasyAsPumpkinPieTruffles-DIY.pdf

Ingredients

• 2 Bags Ghirdardelli Classic
White Chocolate Chips (11oz.)
• 1 Package Golden Oreos
• 1/2 Cup Pumpkin Puree
• 6oz. Cream Cheese (Softened)
• 1/2 Tsp Cinnamon

Directions

  1. Using a food processor, grind the package of Golden Oreos until finely ground.
  2. Mix all ingredients, except the white chocolate chips, together in a bowl until
    smooth. Chill the mixture for 25 minutes.
  3. Begin rolling the chilled mixture into small balls the size of a ping-pong ball,
    and set aside on a baking sheet. Freeze the balls for 25 minutes.
  4. Following the melting instructions on the back of the package, melt the white
    chocolate chips in a small sauce pan over the stovetop. Remove the balls from
    the freezer and dip each ball into the mixture using a fork, lightly tap the fork to
    remove any excess chocolate.
  5. As soon as the chocolate coating dries, they are ready to serve!

Pumpkin Spiced Fudge

SOURCE: https://www.biglots.com/images/marketing/2016/092316-PumpkinSpicedFudge-DIY.pdf

Ingredients

• 2 Bags Ghirdardelli Classic White
Chocolate Chips (11oz.)
• 1 Can Sweetened Condensed Milk
• 1/2 Cup Pumpkin Puree
• 1 Tsp Pumpkin Pie Spice
• Splash of Vanilla Extract
• Cooking Spray

Directions:

  1. Line a 9×9” baking pan with aluminum foil, then spray the lining with cooking spray.
  2. Cook the pumpkin puree over medium heat for 8-10 minutes, stirring continuously.
  3. Add the condensed milk to the pumpkin puree, stirring until the mixture combines.
    Then add the white chocolate chips.
  4. Continue to cook, over low heat, and stir frequently until the chocolate chips
    have melted into the mixture.
  5. Add the pumpkin pie spice and vanilla and continue to cook for 5 more minutes,
    stirring every 30 seconds.
  6. Remove from heat and pour the mixture into the lined, 9×9 pan. Place in the refrigerator
    for 4 hours to cool, then cut into small pieces for serving.
  7. Tip! Fudge can be stored by refrigerating in an airtight container for up to 7 days